Exterior House Painting Price Guide – Hiring a Pro vs. DIY

Adding a fresh coat, or two, of paint to the outside of your house can be a highly satisfying home improvement project.

When done, the neighbors will be sure to notice it and hopefully compliment you. With quality paint, you’ll rest assured your home is good to go for another decade or so, showing off its visual outer layer.

It can also be a fun home improvement project. Focusing on design, immersed in colors, hopefully getting help from a partner, or three — all add to the fun. Though, doing a high quality job will likely require hiring a pro.

Going the DIY route will save on labor costs. Yet, some parts of the overall job can be slow going, unless painting homes is your livelihood. But, who says, you have to do all the work yourself? Or that a pro has to do all the work for you?

Whatever part of the job doesn’t sound like your cup of tea, you can hire a painting contractor for those steps.

The DIY approach

Before grabbing a paint can and brush, there a few things to plan for. Actually, the planning stages can easily take longer than the application of paint. The basic steps are:

  1. Plan for a period of time when it will be dry – likely during warmer months, though above 50 degrees and dry is the key.
  2. Survey the house / work to be done – be sure you know where main color goes and where trim paint goes. Also be on the lookout for any obvious places that could use repair.
  3. Thoroughly clean the old paint – this means using a pressure washer, wet rag (for trim), sanding and scraping. Ideally, you get to a clean, smooth dry surface.
  4. Optional repairs – In the previous step, damaged/rotten wood may make itself visible when thorough cleaning is done. Now is the time to repair. Arguably, this is the most important part of this job as it deals with structure of the house.
  5. Visit your paint store – pick out the color scheme, get the materials. Don’t worry, we list some of the materials later on to help you out.
  6. Prime the house – some paints today are mixed with a primer. Most are not, and this is the first coat to ensure the outer layer has something it can adhere to.
  7. Paint the main color – one coat if on a budget, two coats to be like the pros
  8. Paint the trim – this is likely a different color than the main house color, and it may be more than one additional color. Up to you!
  9. Paint doors, porches, shutters and other items attached to the house. Generally this is the same as the main color, but how you color scheme is up to you.
  10. Cleaning up – do not forget this step. You’ll gain much more satisfaction once this step is done. Unattended to paint, left anywhere, can make for a bigger mess than you may think. Also, make sure all unused paint is properly sealed and stored. Touch ups down the road can be had at no cost if the paint is appropriately sealed.

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Top 20 Home Addition Ideas, Plus Costs and ROI Details

When you’re planning an addition or a major home improvement upgrade, there are so many options and things to take into account that it can get a little overwhelming. 😉

The nature of the home remodeling project itself, the materials you need, the cost of contractors to hire, building permits, whether or not there is a justifiable return on your home improvement investment, e.t.c. -– all of these are important factors to consider when planning your project.

Basic Costs of Hiring a Home Improvement Pro to Keep in Mind

When it comes to costing for your project, keep in mind that on average, you can expect to pay $50 to $100 per hour for an electrician, $20 to $35 per hour for painters and around $70 to $80 an hour for a good carpenter.

We have factored these average prices into our costing. Also note that the prices we mention are on average across the US, however costs may vary depending on where you are building. For example, coastal regions and major cities are likely to cost more than country towns.

Top 20 Major Home Addition Projects to Help You Visualize your own Home Remodeling Journey

  1. BUILDING A GARAGE

When it comes to building a garage, you should start by determining your budget, and then decide on the inclusions you want.

You have two main options to choose from for the design – you can have a detached garage which stands on its own, away from the house, where you could also consider a second level for living, workshop or storage space; or attached so it sits on the side of your home and is generally more affordable.

Whatever design you choose, you need to take into account the following to get an accurate quote: the size you want (double, single, three-car, compact, storage space); what materials it will be built from (for the walls – drywall, metal panels, plastic, cement; for the roof – gypsum, styrofoam, cork, tiles); windows and the type of door you want.

Detached: You’re going to pay more from the outset for detached, which you might put behind the house if there isn’t space to build next to it.

Cost: You’re looking at paying around $15,000 to $20,000 including labor and materials, but you can expect to pay more if you’re including plumbing, electrical lines or HVAC; and add another $5,000 to include a second level. Cost per square foot: $30-$40.

Attached: The less expensive of the two, attached garages connect to your home; saving you money immediately by utilizing one wall you have already in place. That means you’re only building three walls instead of four, and being next to the house, you can take advantage of close proximity to your home’s electricity and plumbing to save on installation fees.

via Atec Builders

Cost: For a single garage, expect to pay between $10,000 and $12,500; while a double garage will be in the vicinity of $30,000. This includes materials and labor costs. Cost per square foot: $40.

ROI: Best return on investment is for detached, which allow for added living space above the garage itself. You could include a small bathroom and kitchenette, then rent that space out to achieve 100% returns (and more).

  1. SUNROOM

Via Patio Enclosures

There is nothing quite like soaking up the morning or afternoon sunshine in your own sunroom and if you have the opportunity to include this as an addition to your home, we highly recommend it. With walls of glass that invite the sunlight in, you’ll be protected from the elements as you enjoy basking in the sunshine all year round.

Sunrooms are affordable and popular, and are generally made from vinyl or aluminum. You can save money by skipping heating and using the room only through the warmer months (or only when the sun is shining directly on the room during winter).

Cost: The average cost of a sunroom addition depends on the size and features you want to include. Generally you’ll pay anywhere from $20,000 up to $75,000, including labor costs for painters, carpenters and electricians.  Average cost per square foot: $350 – $380.

ROI: Adding a sunroom will increase your home’s general value, so if you’re planning on selling any time soon, you should see a 50% return on the money you spend.

  1. CLOSET OR WARDROBE

Reach in closets or walk in closets and wardrobes will help you to keep your sanity in a space that can quickly get messy. Having the freedom to arrange your clothes in open space, without having everything thrown in drawers that are hard to maintain; not to mention the added storage space you’ll gain, makes getting a closet or wardrobe well worth your while.

If you have smaller space to work with and less to store, a closet is the ideal choice. You can choose from a walk-in or a reach-in, depending on how much space you have to work with. If you’re getting one closet or wardrobe, why not buy in bulk – getting all the bedrooms fitted. You’ll save money – and get a greater return in the long run.

Cost: You’ll spend an average of around $1,500 to $2,000 for a simple walk-in closet of around 6.5 foot wide, and between $1,000 and $2,500 for a reach in closet or around $2,500 for a wardrobe. This price will increase if you need extra walls built. Average cost per square foot: $10 – $15.

ROI: 100%. Pay $2,000 for a closet, and if you sell your home, you can easily ask an extra $2,000 to the total price.

  1. ADDITIONAL BEDROOM

via Simply Additions

The family is expanding and you’re running out of space, but rather than move to a bigger house in a different suburb, consider adding another bedroom to your home. It’s easier than you think. Choose to build out, adding the room on the side of the home, or up, adding a second level; with the first option much more affordable and more practical in many circumstances.

Building up could include a single room, or an entire floor, and in either option the price will increase.

Cost: Bedrooms generally don’t need a whole lot of hidden extras, so you can expect to pay between $150 and $250 per square foot, inclusive of labor costs, if you choose to build on the side of the home.

ROI: Building out will add immediate value to your home by extending the building’s perimeter, though it will decrease the amount of yard space. If you’re selling, expect a positive ROI of around 50%.

  1. DORMER

via Slope Side ICF

Many dormers are there for show. They make homes look more appealing to anyone who might be walking past, or considering buying, or they could be more practical in that they provide you the added benefit of more space in your attic.

Adding a dormer to your attic, or including a shed dormer at the back of the home, could help turn it into a more livable space and more flexibility.

Cost: Dormers aren’t cheap. They will cost anywhere from $10,000 to $25,000 (or more) to have installed, depending on size, location on your home and materials required. Average cost per square foot: $80 – $120.

ROI: Added space, more light and better looking style of home are all added benefits if you decide to sell. We’d say you will get around 40% returns financially, but the benefits of the added light will also save on electrical bills, so add another 20%+ over 10 years.

  1. OUTDOOR KITCHEN

via Fireside Outdoor Kitchens

Enjoy summer with all the benefits of an outdoor kitchen, great for entertaining friends and family, or just for yourself. When considering this as an addition on the home, you need to take into account several factors.

The most important is the grill – what type, size, style grill do you want or need to be able to feed all those hungry mouths? Do you want gas, electric or open flame (such as a fire pit)?

Next you need to choose your other features – tile or stainless steel countertops are the most popular, and most resilient choices; cupboard space might be required; and you could need a fridge.

What about a sink? Or are you close enough to the actual kitchen that you can get away with taking a few simple steps from outdoors to indoors? These are just a few of the things to consider.

Cost: Around $5,000 for something basic; up to $150,000 for extravagance. Average cost per square foot: $25 – $70 depending on materials.

ROI: Lapping up a life of luxury, enjoying the sunshine and basking in the glory of your amazing cooking, we’d give this return 100% when it comes to enjoyment.

For financial gain if you decide to sell, you could get a 100%-200% return if you live in a nice, sunshine-filled area where the new owners will benefit greatly from being able to entertain outdoors.

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Zinc: The Dark Horse of Metal Roofing – Zinc Roof Costs 2018-2019

There are not many roofing materials that can match the longevity, durability, malleability, flexibility, resiliency, and cost-effectiveness of Zinc.

Not even aluminum or copper! Zinc roofs are known to last for hundreds of years, even in the most extreme environments.

Truly unmatched durability, longevity, and classic beauty — that’s what zinc roofing offers to a homeowner. — At $12 to $15 per sq. ft. installed, it is the kind of value that is simply unmatched in all other roofing materials.

Zinc — Most Amazing Building Envelope Material You Never Heard of!

In the US, the whole idea of using Zinc as a roofing or cladding material for a house may sound other-worldly.

Aluminum and steel dominate residential metal roofing market, while asphalt shingles are by far the most popular overall roofing material.

When you also factor in natural slate, clay tiles and cedar/wood roofing options, Zinc barely registers on most people’s radars. Though this trend is changing, slowly.

Did you know? 70% of residential roofs in Europe are covered with Zinc. In Paris, this number goes up to 85%.

via Metal Tech USA

Metal roofing is often chosen for its durability and longevity. All properly designed and correctly installed high-end metal roofs are likely to last at least 50 years.

Yet, in order for that to hold true for Steel, for example, it must be coated with metallic finishes such as G-90 galvanized steel and Galvalume (zinc and aluminum coating), along with high quality paint finishes such as Kynar 500. With Zinc, as well as copper, that is not the case.

Both Zinc and Copper form protective patina, meaning they will not rust nor be adversely impacted by weathering.

Both of these metals benefit from aging, and their patina process.

With Zinc, it starts out dark, as in dark gray / near black and then changes to a patina light gray or bluish color. Zinc can also be painted virtually any color, which serves as a sacrificial layer prior to the patination process.

Did you know? Thanks to Zinc’s naturally-forming self-healing properties, it can provide years of virtually maintenance-free roof and building envelope protection

Zinc Standing Seam Roof with level changes on a House
via CraftCorp

What makes Zinc truly fascinating is its resiliency. All metal roofs, including Zinc, can be scratched. With Steel, scratches in its coating layer will expose the base material to the effects of oxidation and corrosion.

With Zinc, it actually self-heals. You read that right, Zinc if scratched will self correct.

The protective (patina) layer of Zinc is technically hydroxyl carbonate that will, over time, reform itself and thus eliminate blemishes or scratches. This is one, of a few reasons, why the market for Zinc will often sell pre-patinated Zinc roofing.

As you may have guessed, Zinc is extremely durable. When steel is “galvanized”, it is really just adding a protective layer of Zinc to dteel base to protect it from oxidation, as Steel is naturally corrosive, or will rust when exposed to salt, water, or moist environment over a long period of time. galvanized and Galvalume Steel will forgo that aging for a couple of decades.

Like most metals, Zinc is insect-proof, fire resistant, and mildew / fungus-proof. Zinc also benefits from being non-toxic. Because of its low to non-existence toxicity level, soft zinc is marketed as replacement for flashing material for all roofs.

Back in the day, the traditional material was lead, then steel, but soft zinc, offers virtually the same level of durability with no known toxicity impact.

Did you know? Run-off water from Zinc is considered ‘clear’ or contaminant free, which most metals can’t readily claim. Thus, a zinc roof is a great option for homeowners interested in rain water collection.

Like many other metals, zinc is fully recyclable. Plus, it will reflect solar radiant heat, as most metals do to some degree, which prevents the unwanted transfer of heat from the roofing material into the attic space.

On the contrary: Asphalt shingles gain a lot of heat during the day and transfer much of it inside your home.

Moreover Zinc has even greater environmental value in that it takes less fuel to manufacture it, really to boil it and shape it into finished roofing product.

Did you know? Aluminum and steel use a good two to four times the amount of energy in their production compared to Zinc.

All this value would make you think it’s gotta be at least as expensive as Copper. Nope. Not necessarily.

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