Slate Roof Cost in 2021: Colors, Pros & Cons, Installation, and ROI

Slate roofs have a lot going for them in terms of longevity, durability, and classic beauty and style. Much of it is well known, some of it is not so well known.

Yes, natural slate is among the most costly and alluring roofing options for homes, but it is certainly not intended for every roof structure or house.

Cost

The high price of slate is perhaps one of its most significant drawbacks. In extreme cases, it may cost about the same to cover a one square area of the roof (100 sq. ft.) with high-end natural slate tiles, as it does to cover a small roof, say 1,000 sq. ft. (or 10 squares), with asphalt shingles. Yet, going strictly by price alone would be an entirely unfair comparison between the two drastically different roofing materials. Slate holds significantly more value than asphalt shingles.

That said, you can expect to pay between $15.00 and $25.00 per square foot to install slate tiles on a typical single-family house. Most homes with slate roofs are larger than an average-sized home. Assuming a roof size of 25 squares or 2,500 square feet, you can expect a total average price range of $37,500 to $62,500 to install a new slate roof on a suitable house with reinforced roof frame (to support the weight of a slate roof).

For most roof types, a professional roofing contractor is your best bet for getting that quality installation, but with natural slate tiles, it is best to go with a slater or a slate roofing specialist.

While a non-specialist or a typical roofer may at first feel confident about their ability to install it, they would often be wrong.

But, if you are really tempted to cut labor costs and go this route, be sure to ask them about their experience and for references or examples of their previous slate roof installations.

As this page on Roofing Calc points out, a poorly installed slate roof is a like not having a roof at all.

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Garden Patios Costs, Plus Pros & Cons, and ROI in 2021

Patios are traditionally made with natural stone, concrete, or gravel. Pavers are an option composed of concrete and a color additive to form a tile, stone, or brick-like pieces. Patios are similar to decks as both provide outdoor space, usually in the rear or backyard of a home, for relaxing, dining and entertaining guests.

Decks Vs. Patios

While decks are often elevated structures made from wood or composite materials, patios, on the other hand, are routinely installed at a ground level.

Patio Pricing Information – Part 1

Size, of course, is the main cost factor. A small patio say 7 by 7 feet provides a cozy place for two to share a drink. If desiring a place to dine, at a table with 4 chairs, then a mid-sized patio around 12×12, or larger, is the size to consider.

Large patios offer an outdoor living room, coming in at 15 by 15 or larger. Nothing says a patio needs to be square in shape, and rounded edges, or rectangular patios are quite common.

Cambridge Pavers

The price to install is based on material times square footage. On average, patios cost from $5.50 to $25.00 per sq. ft. installed. That’s a huge gap between the low-end and high-end pricing, but the middle 80% range is closer to $7.50 to $14.00 per sq. ft. installed. Generally, the least expensive material is a gravel patio, while flagstone fetches the highest prices.

Before any work begins, planning is the first step. In some areas, you may need a building permit and a site plan to provide your local zoning office with the patio design you seek to implement.

As the approval can sometimes take weeks, other planning considerations include what accessories you may wish to furnish your patio with, along with how each item will lay out. Since everything is at a ground level, you might consider laying items on the lawn to get a feel of layout in a three-dimensional way that a site plan won’t readily convey.

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2021 Stone Siding Cost, Pros & Cons: Natural Stone vs. MSV

Stone as a siding material has two main options: natural and faux. The price difference between the two can be as much as $20 per sq. ft. Aesthetically, the two options are nearly identical and many of the benefits are the same.

via Dutch Quality Stone

Did you know? Natural stone will last about twice as long as faux stone veneer.

Faux stone, also known as Cast or Manufactured Stone Veneer (MSV) consists of concrete and utilizes dozens of pigments to achieve its color. Mostly it is made to look as close to natural stone as possible.

Often, the beauty of natural stone is overlooked. Rock can be anywhere from light in color, to dark, to even blue and red.

For MSV to mimic the natural stuff, it must also be cast from molds that are shaped by natural stone pieces. Once finished, faux stone becomes a lighter and less expensive option to ship, install and ultimately to pay for as a consumer.

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