Average Roof Lifespan – How Long Does a Roof Last?

When estimating the average roof lifespan, don’t go by the warranty!

Roofing material warranty lengths have little to do with how long the roof will last. That’s reality.

An asphalt shingle with a 25-year warranty will look terrible in 20 years. Some shingles come with a “lifetime” warranty, “lol”.

A better way to ask the question is, “how long will that roof look good?” And yes, “how long will it keep out rain?” is obviously worth considering. The answers will be about the same number of years.

This no-nonsense guide gives you the real-life answers to the question – How long do shingles vs metal vs slate vs wood shakes, etc., last? Keep reading for the answers.

Most Common Roof Types and their Lifespans

Here’s the overview followed by a deep dive on the longevity of all roofing materials and options within them, such as 3-tab vs architectural vs premium asphalt shingles.

  • Asphalt Shingles – 12 to 30 years
  • Steel – 30 to 60 years
  • Aluminum – 40 to 70 years
  • Zinc – 70 to 100+ years
  • Copper – 100+ years
  • Cedar Shakes and Shingles – 25 to 40 years
  • Slate – 50 to “Forever”
  • Clay Tiles – 50 to 100 years
  • Concrete Tiles – 40 to 80 years
  • Synthetic Composite and Rubber Shingles – 20 to 50 years
  • Green or Vegetative Roofs – Up to 40 years
  • Flat Roofs – 10 to 40 years

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Top 15 Kitchen Countertops Costs and Pros & Cons in 2021

If you’re looking to install new countertops in your kitchen, you’re not alone – 95% of homeowners looking to renovate say that “kitchen countertops are their top priority this year”.

This consumer buying guide covers top 15 countertop options, along with each material’s pros and cons, and the average cost to install.

  1. Granite countertops

What it is: You probably already know! Granite is a natural stone countertop material which has been highly prized in the kitchen for many years. It is available in a wide variety of colors and blends well with many different flooring and wall designs.

Granite countertops are becoming more and more common thanks to their increased availability and affordability.

What it costs: Granite can be expensive. Prices between $80 and $150 per square foot installed are not uncommon, depending on the color of the granite, the manufacturer, and where you live.

Pros: Because granite is highly sought after and considered beautiful, the countertops will add non-depreciating value to your home. It is non-porous and sanitary, heat-resistant, and easy to clean. It does not get scratched easily.

Cons: Granite is very difficult to remove, and should be considered a “forever” upgrade, because you may have to rip out the entire counter if you get sick of it. It is expensive when compared to other common countertop materials.

It is also labor-intensive because it is so heavy, which means that it may require additional structural support than what your counters already offer. It must be sealed roughly every 10 years or so to prevent staining, and it can crack if hit by a large, heavy object.

  1. Quartzite countertops

What it is:

Not to be confused with countertops labeled “quartz” – which are a kind of manmade composite, consisting of about 90% quartz and 10% resin – quartzite is a relatively new solid-stone alternative to granite or engineered quartz countertops.

Quartzite is a naturally occurring rock that starts its life as a kind of sandstone and evolves into quartzite when subjected to heat and pressure. The resulting white or gray rock tends to have beautiful streaks of color, giving it the look of marble while maintaining the toughness of granite.

A word of caution, however – the term tends to be used somewhat loosely by manufacturers, so it is important to check with your supplier to find out if your quartzite is “hard” or “soft” quartzite, which will affect how durable the material is, and how often routine sealing must be done to care for it.

What it costs: $85 to $150 per square foot installed, depending on the type of quartzite you choose and where you live.

Pros: The neutral colors of quartzite look nice against almost any kitchen color scheme. Its natural swirl patterns lend a clean, modern, organic look. It is somewhat heat resistant (although protection should be used if you intend to leave a hot pot sitting for a while).

Did you know? Quartzite is also harder than granite, making it a little more durable.

Cons: Depending on the type of quartzite, periodic sealing must be done (as with any stone surface) to avoid staining. Also, because it is a heavy stone, it requires professional installation.

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Top 12 Signs You Need a New Roof Soon – When to Replace a Roof

Some of these tell-tale signs indicate your roof needs replacement right now. Others are clues it won’t be long before you need a new roof.

  1. Roof Leaks – Water staining or damage in your attic or on ceilings
  2. Visible Deterioration – Cupping shingles, splitting shakes, cracked tiles, rusting metal
  3. Missing Roofing – From wind damage, poor installation, walking on it
  4. Algae Streaks – Washing will sometimes help
  5. Sagging Roof Line / Spongy Roof – You’ll need a tear-off and the roof decking replaced
  6. Daylight in the Attic – You need roof replacement “yesterday”
  7. Storm Damage – Call your insurance agent to see what’s covered
  8. Moss – Clear the moss, but moss traps moisture, and it might be too late
  9. Blistering – Moisture below, a sure sign of needed roof replacement, causes blisters
  10. Missing Flashing – Check around walls, dormers and chimneys where water can penetrate
  11. Granules in Your Gutters – The shingles are losing reflectivity, and shingle damage will soon follow
  12. Your Roof is Just Old – See expected roof life estimates below, and plan ahead for a new roof

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