Metal Shingle Roofing Costs & Value in 2023: Materials, Cost, Pros & Cons

Installing a metal shingle roof on a residential home will cost, on average, between $11.50 and $19.50 per sq. ft. In this buying guide, we’ll explain all the important factors that determine the total cost of a metal shingles, along with pros and cons. We’ll also cover material costs of various metal shingle options and draw some comparisons to other popular roofing materials.

It’s perhaps most important to realize that of the three primary options for metal roofing (the others being Standing Seam at the high-end, and Corrugated and Ribbed Metal Panels at the low-end), metal shingles and tiles are in the middle of the pack in terms of costs.

Understanding Your Options

At first mention, metal shingles sound bland or traditional, or perhaps too risky of an option for an HOA or in an area where metal would clearly be outside the norm (i.e., all your neighbors have asphalt roofs).

Estimated New Roof Costs (2,000 sq.ft.)
Asphalt
Metal
Flat
$8,500
$15,500
$11,500
See what local pros charge

Yet, when researching metal shingles styles and options for residential homes, you might be surprised to pull up some images that look a lot like asphalt shingles. 😉

Why would that be? Because the reality of metal shingles today, is that these are really metal tiles that are intended to mimic just about all other possible roofing styles designed for sloped roofs; slate tiles, ceramic tiles, asphalt shingles, cedar shakes and say redwood shingle are all materials that metal shingles can mimic.

From the curbside view, it would be hard to tell the difference between the metal material and its usual counterparts. That’s how diverse the metal roofing industry has gotten.

Add to this the idea that metal itself can have a pleasing appearance, as is the case with copper, zinc, painted aluminum and steel tiles. Gone are the days when metal shingles would only have a silver/gray, metallic appearance.

Key Fact: There are really two basic types of metal shingles, or metal tiles: G-90 galvanized steel coated with a protective layer of zinc plating, often finished in a factory-applied Kynar 500 paint finish, and the second type finished with stone granules referred to as stone-coated steel tiles.

Did you know? The “G-90” refers to the amount of protective zinc plating, as in .90oz per square foot of steel sheet.

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The Cost of a Standing Seam Metal Roof, Plus Pros & Cons 2023

Standing seam is the premier choice in residential metal roofing. It is also the most expensive; around two or three times the cost of corrugated metal panels and asphalt shingles, and about 10% to 20% more than metal shingles like interlocking steel and aluminum tiles and shakes.

Standing seam offers unbeatable value (through durability, longevity, energy-efficiency, and style) that is hard for any other roofing material to match. Let’s explore this in further detail:

Cost

The current national average cost to install a standing seam metal roof on a typical single-family house can range between $12.50 and $20.50 per square foot or $1,250 and $2,050 per square. This assumes a professional and warrantied installation of G-90 galvanized steel or Galvalume 26-gauge or 24-gauge (better) steel panels finished with the factory applied Kynar 500 paint finish. Aluminum panels finished with Kynar 500 paint are also an option and may cost slightly more than steel.

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IKO Shingles Review: Quality, Cost, Pros & Cons, Buying Guide

IKO shingles are available in most regions of the country, though they certainly don’t sell as well as GAF, Atlas, Owens Corning, CertainTeed, and selection is more limited than what’s available from other leading brands.

Yeah, but aren’t IKO shingles junk?

Problem: Reputation is a major reason why IKO asphalt shingles remain a second-tier player in market share.

The brand was once notorious for poor quality. Particularly bad was the issue of granule loss.

Granules are the colored ceramic beads embedded in the surface of the shingle for various purposes that include reflecting the sun to protect the asphalt from heat damage and from drying out and cracking.

Solved: However, IKO seems to have solved the issue. The company spent millions of dollars in the last few years to improve this aspect of manufacturing. Granules are staying on better than they were just a few years ago in tests of brand-new shingles.

While IKO’s reputation still needs rehabbing, the products have improved to the point IKO asphalt shingles are worth considering alongside the names mentioned.

Cheap, good, and premium: To be sure, IKO still makes shingles at various quality levels, just like the other brands, so making blanket statements about quality is meaningless.

This IKO asphalt shingles review breaks down the IKO lines with information and quality ratings for each.

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