New Gas Furnace Prices & Installation Costs 2023: Top Brands

A gas furnace remains the most popular heat source in homes across the country.

Today’s furnaces are affordable and efficient, a cost-effective choice when you select a model that is right for your region’s climate and the level of indoor comfort you want.

Selecting the ideal furnace for your home can be done in a few steps that we’ll guide you through.

New Gas Furnace Installation Cost

For a fully installed furnace, plan to spend between $4,500 and $8,500, on average. Most new furnace units are currently priced between $1,600 and $5,000, but professional installation with the contractor obtaining a building permit and getting the completed job inspected is almost always in your best interest, for reasons we’ll explain below.

The current national average (80% range) is about $5,000-$7,500 for a new gas furnace fully installed.

Furnaces with 90% and higher efficiency average $6,400 to $10,000. These gas furnace costs include any necessary building permits and inspections, a new gas furnace unit and standard supplies, professional installation, and a typical 5-year to 10-year workmanship warranty from the installer.

Most HVAC contractors typically charge between $75 to $125 per hour for their work, and may include an assistant, or a team of three to complete the job faster. Their helpers often cost $50+ an hour as well when you consider the worker’s comp on top of their base pay.

Professional installation generally requires 10-man hours at a minimum, but can easily go up to 15-20 hours due to many reasons, usually related to adjusting or updating the forced air system, providing additional ductwork, removing, and disposing of the old boiler/furnace, removing old radiators, etc.

If significant updates are needed to your per-existing ductwork or if there is no ductwork currently in place, this can add anywhere from $5,500 to $15,500 to the total cost of the job.

Typically, it will cost under $10,000 for new ductwork or modifications to the existing ductwork, and often these additional charges are only steep if/when converting from say an electric furnace or oil boiler to a gas furnace, which requires new ductwork for forced air heating to work.

Other costs that may be included are removal and disposal of an older furnace (about $750-$1,500 extra), and miscellaneous materials and supplies needed to complete the installation.

*Other Extras: Gas line, vent, wiring and circuit breaker. If your project is furnace replacement vs a new furnace, some of the old equipment should be usable for the new furnace.

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Top 20 Home Addition Ideas, Plus Costs and ROI Details in 2023

When you’re planning an addition or a major home improvement upgrade, there are so many options and things to take into account that it can get a little overwhelming. 😉

The nature of the home remodeling project itself, the materials you need, the cost of contractors to hire, building permits, whether there is a justifiable return on your home improvement investment, etc. – all of these are important factors to consider when planning your project.

Basic Costs of Hiring a Home Improvement Pro to Keep in Mind

When it comes to costing for your project, keep in mind that on average, you can expect to pay $75 to $125 per hour for an electrician, $35 to $65 per hour for professional painters, and around $75 to $100 per hour for a good carpenter.

We have factored these average prices into our costing. Also note that the prices we mention are on average across the US, however costs may vary depending on where you are building. For example, coastal regions and major cities are likely to cost significantly more than country towns.

Top 20 Major Home Addition Projects to Help You Visualize your own Home Remodeling Journey

  1. BUILDING A GARAGE

When it comes to building a garage, you should start by determining your budget, and then decide on the inclusions you want.

You have two main options to choose from for the design – you can have a detached garage which stands on its own, away from the house, where you could also consider a second level for living, workshop, or storage space; or attached so it sits on the side of your home and is generally more affordable.

Whatever design you choose, you need to consider the following to get an accurate quote: the size you want (double, single, three-car, compact, storage space); what materials it will be built from (for the walls – drywall, metal panels, plastic, cement; for the roof – gypsum, Styrofoam, cork, tiles); windows and the type of door you want.

Detached: You’re going to pay more from the outset for detached, which you might put behind the house if there isn’t space to build next to it.

Cost: You’re looking at paying around $35,000 to $65,000 including labor and materials, but you can expect to pay more if you’re also including plumbing, electrical lines or HVAC; and add another $25,000-35,000 to include a second level. Cost per square foot: $45.00 – $100.00.

Attached: The less expensive of the two, attached garages connect to your home; saving you money immediately by utilizing one wall you have already in place. That means you’re only building three walls instead of four, and being next to the house, you can take advantage of close proximity to your home’s electricity and plumbing to save on wiring and installation fees.

via Atec Builders

Cost: For a single car garage, expect to pay between $25,000 and $45,000; while a double garage will be in the vicinity of $50,000-$60,500. This includes materials and professional labor costs. Cost per square foot: $35-$75.

ROI: Best return on investment can sometimes be achieved for a detached garage, especially when coupled with an added living space above the garage itself. You could include a small bathroom and kitchenette, then rent that space out to achieve 100% returns (or more).

  1. SUNROOM

Via Patio Enclosures

There is nothing quite like soaking up the morning or afternoon sunshine in your own sunroom and if you can include this as an addition to your home, we highly recommend it.

With walls of glass that invite the sunlight in, you’ll be protected from the elements as you enjoy basking in the sunshine all year round.

Sunrooms are affordable and popular and are generally made from vinyl or aluminum. You can save money by skipping heating and using the room only through the warmer months (or only when the sun is shining directly on the room during winter).

Cost: The average cost of a sunroom addition depends on the size and features you want to include. Generally, you’ll pay anywhere from $25,000 up to $75,000, including labor costs for painters, carpenters and electricians. Average cost per square foot can range as much as: $50 – $150.

ROI: Adding a sunroom will increase your home’s general value, so if you’re planning on selling any time soon, you should see a 50% return on the money you spend.

  1. CLOSET OR WARDROBE

Reach in closets or walk-in closets and wardrobes will help you to keep your sanity in a space that can quickly get messy.

Having the freedom to arrange your clothes in open space, without having everything thrown in drawers that are hard to maintain; not to mention the added storage space you’ll gain, makes getting a closet or wardrobe well worth your while.

If you have smaller space to work with and less to store, a closet is the ideal choice. You can choose from a walk-in or a reach-in, depending on how much space you must work with.

If you’re getting one closet or wardrobe, why not buy in bulk – getting all the bedrooms fitted. You’ll save money – and get a greater return in the long run.

Cost: You’ll spend an average of around $1,500 to $2,500 for a simple walk-in closet of around 6.5 foot wide, and between $1,500 and $2,800 for a reach in closet or around $3,000 for a wardrobe. This price will increase if you need extra walls built. Average cost per square foot: $15 – $30.

ROI: 100%. Pay $2,000 for a closet, and if you sell your home, you can easily ask an extra $2,000 to the total price.

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Top 15 Kitchen Countertops Costs and Pros & Cons – 2023 Update

Recycled glass countertop

If you’re looking to install new countertops in your kitchen, you’re not alone – 95% of homeowners looking to renovate say that “kitchen countertops are their top priority this year”.

This consumer buying guide covers top 15 countertop options, along with each material’s pros and cons, and the average cost to install.

  1. Granite countertops

Granite Countertop for sale at Lowe's

What it is: You probably already know! Granite is a natural stone countertop material which has been highly prized in the kitchen for many years. It is available in a wide variety of colors and blends well with many different flooring and wall designs.

Granite countertops are becoming more and more common thanks to their increased availability and affordability.

Granite worktop samples on display at Lowe's

What it costs: Granite can be expensive. Prices between $85 and $175 per square foot installed are not uncommon, depending on the size, color, thickness, and pattern of the granite slab, manufacturer/supplier and installer, and where you live.

Pros: Because granite is highly sought after and considered beautiful, the countertops will add non-depreciating value to your home. It is non-porous and sanitary, heat-resistant, and easy to clean. It does not get scratched easily.

Cons: Granite is very difficult to remove, and should be considered a “forever” upgrade, because you may have to rip out the entire counter if you get sick of it. It is expensive when compared to other common countertop materials.

It is also labor-intensive because it is so heavy, which means that it may require additional structural support than what your counters already offer. It must be sealed roughly every 10 years or so to prevent staining, and it can crack if hit by a large, heavy object.

  1. Quartzite countertops

What it is:

Not to be confused with countertops labeled “quartz” – which are a kind of manmade composite, consisting of about 90% quartz and 10% resin – quartzite is a relatively new solid-stone alternative to granite or engineered quartz countertops.

Quartzite is a naturally occurring rock that starts its life as a kind of sandstone and evolves into quartzite when subjected to heat and pressure. The resulting white or gray rock tends to have beautiful streaks of color, giving it the look of marble while maintaining the toughness of granite.

A word of caution, however – the term tends to be used somewhat loosely by manufacturers, so it is important to check with your supplier to find out if your quartzite is “hard” or “soft” quartzite, which will affect how durable the material is, and how often routine sealing must be done to care for it.

What it costs: $85 to $150 per square foot installed, depending on the type of quartzite you choose and where you live.

Pros: The neutral colors of quartzite look nice against almost any kitchen color scheme. Its natural swirl patterns lend a clean, modern, organic look. It is somewhat heat resistant (although protection should be used if you intend to leave a hot pot sitting for a while).

Did you know? Quartzite is also harder than granite, making it a little more durable.

Cons: Depending on the type of quartzite, periodic sealing must be done (as with any stone surface) to avoid staining. Also, because it is a heavy stone, it requires professional installation.

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