2022 Vinyl Siding Cost Per Sq.Ft. Installed, Plus Pros & Cons, and ROI

PVC is widely understood as a heavy-duty plastic-based material. The “V” in the middle of the acronym stands for Vinyl, which in the home siding market, represents the #1 selling material for most of the US. The PVC used for siding benefits from additives that resist color fading and increase flexibility, while not sacrificing durability.

For residential siding, vinyl is quite versatile. The horizontal plank (bevel) style is the most common cladding option for vinyl, but there are many more ways it is utilized as a cladding material for homes and buildings. On the east coast, vinyl’s primary competition comes from wood and fiber cement, while stucco dominates the western part of the US.

Cost

Because R-Value is a key factor when considering any siding material, it is important to note that vinyl siding takes this into consideration and that this skews its pricing data.

Generally, costs for vinyl are based on material thickness, with most residential products ranging from .040 to .046 inches thick, or about 1/16th of an inch. At that level of thickness, the R-value is unsurprisingly low.

However, vinyl comes in one of two primary variations: hollow-back and insulated, or foam-back. The foam-back provides at least 3 times (or more) the R-value, while increasing the cost by at most 3 times, or usually doubling it.

In terms of what to expect pricing-vise, vinyl siding costs between $7.50 and $14.50 per sq. ft. installed. This breaks down to the low-end cost of $5.50 to $8.50 per sq. ft. for hollow-back (uninsulated) siding. Mid-range cost is $7.50 to $12.50 per sq. ft. for foam-back siding. The high-end or deluxe vinyl siding costs between $8.50 and $14.50 per square foot installed.

On average, hollow-back vinyl siding installation results in a $11,000 to $17,000 overall cost for a typical two-bedroom to three-bedroom sized house with approximately 2,000 sq.ft. of siding. Foam-back siding averages between $15,000 and $29,000 installed on a similar property om the US.

While “average” is a bit vague, we’ll break the costs down further (next section) and explain the factors that impact costs (2 sections below).

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Stucco Siding Cost, Options, Plus Pros and Cons in 2022

Stucco siding is a plaster-like cladding, specially blended for exterior weathering. It’s a very popular siding option with over half of new single-family homes sold in the western quadrant of the US. having such an exterior.

via Western Art and Architecture

In fact, according to the U.S. Census data, stucco (and not vinyl) is the #1 siding option in America.

The base of stucco consists of sand, cement, and lime. It may sound plain a bit like “Plain Jane”, and in many regions it may even be applied in its most simple form. But there are so many variations to texturing and coloring of stucco that it may deserve a second look by a discerning homeowner.

Cost

Application of stucco requires solid masonry skill, as cement can harden quickly. It’s usually applied in one of the two installation methods; Both entail the wooden wall sheathing as the first layer, or substrate, followed by a water barrier sheet, which in turn is followed by a metal lath so the cement layer has something to bind to.

Then, there is a scratch coat of cement which makes the top layer(s) easier to apply. The two variations are then a decision point for a homeowner who must decide on whether it’s best to go with a single coat or multiple coats — usually 3 layers. The outermost layer is where the texturing and design are emphasized.

Stucco siding costs between $8.50 and $16.50 per sq. ft. installed. Higher costs per sq. ft. come mainly from additional layers and/or sophisticated design techniques, such as dashing (which we’ll cover below). Cost factors also deal with regional availability of materials and qualified installers.

A typical two-bedroom or three-bedroom sized home with approximately 2,000 sq.ft. of siding will have a price of $17,000 to $33,000 for a standard stucco siding. As there are numerous factors that impact the price, we will help explain that, but first let’s break down the costs.

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Metal Siding Options, Costs and Pros & Cons in 2022

Residential metal siding offers five primary choices of materials: G-90 Galvanized steel, Galvalume coated steel, aluminum, zinc, and copper. Steel and Aluminum are the predominant choices when it comes to metal wall cladding systems available for residential and commercial projects.

via Bridger Steel

Zinc wall panels are considerably more expensive, but they are also more durable and longer lasting compared to steel and aluminum. Zinc panels are typically used in high-end commercial metal wall projects and roofing applications.

Copper is the more exotic and most expensive metal that can also be used in roofing and metal wall cladding applications. However, copper is rarely used as a siding material due to its high cost and highly reflective surface, which makes it far more suitable for roofing

Thanks to the remarkable durability and versatility of metal, the panels can be shaped as corrugated or ribbed, or made to mimic lap siding or vertical boards. However, metal siding doesn’t attempt to mimic stucco, stone or brick siding, as these generally constitute unique shapes.

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