Concrete and Clay Tile Roof Costs and Pros and Cons: Concrete Vs. Clay Tiles in 2017

Tile roofs been going in and out of style, but they’re guaranteed to last for quite a while. Traditional tiles are made from either clay or concrete. The latter tends to be less expensive, but there is clearly more value in a clay tile roof.

Styles And Variety

In North America, tile roofing is often associated with the southwestern US feeling. Deep red, clay tiles on a home with stucco siding is what normally comes to mind when we picture roof tiles. Yet, that’s just one possibility.

Historically, Dutch and European immigrants have been in the business of importing clay tiles into the New World since about 1650. All the way through the end of the 1700’s, it was a very popular material which was viewed as superior to wood, because it was fireproof. By the mid 1700’s, America had established itself as a country able to manufacture glazed and unglazed tiles.

As the industrial age chugged along, metal roofing started to grow in popularity, which lead to the decline in the dominance of the clay tile market. Metal is as durable and in many cases, less expensive than tiles. Yet, there have been at least two revival periods in the last 200 years, which is why tile roofing has never lost its stature in the overall roofing industry.

Concrete vs. Clay Tiles and their Impact on Colors

While clay is the historic and predominant material, concrete is the other primary material option. Clay tiles normally come in two types: glazed (liquid glass baked onto the tile) or unglazed. They hold color much better than concrete, especially in the case of Terracotta clay. Regardless of the material, color is mixed in with the material during the production. With cement, color will fade somewhere between 30 and 50 years. With clay, the color will hold steady for 50 to 70 years. And with Terracotta, it is indefinite or for sure 100+ years.

Adding in tile shape and texture, provides a rather limitless variety of options. But generally, architects are going for a particular, established style. Multi-colored tiles on a roof is an option that goes somewhat against the historic norms. Accessories are part of the installation, such that tiles shaped and formed for ridges, hips and gable ends add even more opportunity for greater variety.

Cost and Value

Cost of Materials

Nailing down the exact cost can be a bit challenging. If tiles are plentiful in your region, then expect to pay anywhere from $5 to $9 per sq. ft. for materials alone. Note that concrete tiles can be made to be very light-weight and are available in a wide variety of colors and shapes. Though again, concrete doesn’t hold color as well as clay. Clay tiles will cost anywhere from $6 to $11 per sq. ft. for materials. Other research shows that clay tile will cost 30% more on average than concrete tiles.

Total Cost Installed

The 2017 data shows clay tiles cost between $12 and $17 per sq. ft. to install on a roof. If choosing a more sophisticated design of the tile, that range can go up to $20 to $30 per sq. ft. installed. — This would make it more expensive than natural Slate, or Copper roofing. For a home that has a roof size of about 2,000 sq. ft., the overall average installation cost can range from $25,000 to $40,000 depending on the choice of materials, roof complexity, and location. Should you decide to go for a high-end tile roof, a similarly-sized, premium clay tile roof could cost as much as $40,000 to $60,000 to install.

Structural Requirements

Before you can install clay or concrete tile roof, it is best to have your home inspected by an engineer to ensure it can hold the extra weight that comes with standard concrete and clay material. While, Asphalt shingles weigh about 250 to 400 lbs per square (100 sq. ft.), concrete tips the scale at 950 to 1200 pounds per square, so up to 10 times the weight. Thus, unless your roof was specifically designed to carry the weight of tiles, it will likely require structural reinforcement.

Benefits

But the benefits are enormous. At the top is longevity. Clay and concrete will last a good 50 years minimum, and exceeding 100 years is certainly possible with proper installation. To get the kind of longevity tiles are capable of providing, you will need to hire an experienced tile roofer. Allowing a handyman to do the job will might help save some money upfront, but this might lead to problems later on. Furthermore, having anyone who is not experienced with how to properly traverse the roof can lead to broken tiles. While clay and concrete are undoubtedly durable over the long haul, the material itself is a bit fragile in terms of impact resistance from full body weight.

Clay and Concrete Tiles vs. Slate

Stone is rather impervious to water. Clay has water absorption of about 6%, while Concrete can absorb as much as 13%. Slate is a material that edges out clay, while wood is known to be rather poor in this regard. There are more benefits, and even disadvantages, which we’ll cover below.

Pros

  • longevity and durability – material will last 50+ years
  • virtually water proof, insect proof, fire proof, and resists rotting
  • low to almost no maintenance, though see Disadvantage with regards to underlayment
  • wonderful variety, very unique and beautiful appearance, color that will last (if going with Clay)

Cons

  • fragile when walked on, tiles can break rather easily
  • underlayment material won’t last as long as material, and so that underlayment needs to be replaced even while the roofing tiles will be fine. A roofer would remove all tiles, replace underlayment material and then re-install old tiles on the new underlayment.
  • one of the more expensive roofing materials
  • added weight is significant enough factor that it may not work for every home

Cost & Benefits of Ribbed Metal Roofing: Pros & Cons 2017-2018

Ribbed metal roofing is in the same family as Corrugated metal roofing. It is made in a similar fashion (at a metal mill), attached to the roof in the same way, and installation costs are about the same.

The key difference is in the appearance. Ribbed metal can be mistaken for Standing Seam, which is on the upper echelon of metal roofing.

Cost

Based on the price of materials alone, Ribbed metal paneling is certainly in the same ball park as Corrugated metal paneling.

The pricing does depend a bit on who you are purchasing the materials from, but a price range of $1.00 to $3.00 per linear foot is what you’ll routinely find. — This assumes you are going with a coated steel (i.e. galvanized or Galvalume), stainless steel or aluminum product. Then add a minimum of $2.50 to $4.00 per sq. ft. for professional installation, and you’ll get a base rate of $4.00 to $7.00 per sq. ft. of ribbed metal panelling installed.

Note: Labor costs may be higher than $3 per sq. ft. Total cost ought to be below $8.00 to $10 per sq. ft., so that means the labor charge could go as high as $5.00 to $7.00 per sq. ft. in some cases.

Why would installation costs ever be that much higher higher? Well location is part of it, along with complexity of your roof, slope, or pitch, of the roof, and amount of custom metal flashing required for the job.

If your existing roof is to be torn off and disposed of, that would be a separate line item cost. Same goes with possible repairs to the roof. The good news is that Ribbed metal roofing can be installed over the existing roof.

For an average sized roof (say 1,600 sq.ft.), the total installation cost is likely to fall within $6,500 to $10,000.

A very large roof, say 3,000 sq. ft. would then be double, right? Not necessarily. If it is a non-complex roof, it could be significantly less than double as the more product you order and the more work being provided to the contractor, the less of an overall charge per sq. ft. the project could result in.

ROI: With all metal roofing, the return (value to cost) on your investment will be excellent. It starts at around 86% and, again, depending on your location may be higher.

This means if you spend $10,000 for such a roof and sell your home while the roof is still is great condition, you can plan to recoup $8,600 of that value just from this part of your home.

Residential markets along the east coast of the U.S. tend to fetch better than 86% ROI.

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New Gas Furnace Prices and Installation Costs 2017-2018

Controlling the climate of your home during chilly months requires a heating source and way to distribute that energy. A modern gas furnace can be your best option for a home heating source. Selecting the ideal furnace for your home can be had with a few steps that we’ll guide you through.

Gas Furnace Installation Cost Information

For a fully installed furnace, plan to spend between $2000 and $6000. The furnace units themselves are usually under $1500. But professional installation is in your best interest, for reasons we’ll explain below. The current national average is about $4200 for a new furnace installation.

HVAC contractors typically charge $50 to $75 per hour for their work, and may include an assistant, or team of three, to complete the job. Their helpers often earn $50 an hour as well. Installation generally requires 10 man hours at minimum, but can easily go up due to many reasons, usually related to adjusting or updating the forced air system.

If significant updates are needed to your ductwork, this can add up to $15,000 to the cost. Typically, it is under $10,000 and often these additional charges are only steep if converting from say an electric furnace to a gas one.

Other costs that may be included include paying for a permit and inspection services (check with your local municipality), removal and disposal of an older furnace, and miscellaneous materials needed to complete the installation.

Gas Furnace Prices for Top Brands

If you look just at the Energy Star list which shows the many models on the market that have their stamp of approval (for being high in energy efficiency), you’ll see a good 30 brands. At least one of our top recommendations is not on their list, even though their models obtain a 98 AFUE. Go figure.

Another thing you may not realize is the popular manufacturers are making more than one brand. The makers of Carrier, for instance, are United Technologies and they also make Bryant, Day & Night, Payne and Tempstar.

Carrier is considered a premium brand with reputation for reliability, while Payne is considered “budget friendly.” The technology among the devices are nearly identical.

Here are the Top Five Gas Furnace Brands:

1 – Goodman – these are made by the same company that manufactures the more popular Amana brand. Goodman has basic models that come in at 80 AFUE and high efficiency models with up to 98 AFUE.

Warranties range from 20 years (for basic models) to lifetime (for premium models). You may not find the latest and greatest features in their lineup, but the ones we’ve mentioned are available. And most importantly, they are affordable, ranging from as low as $400 (for their electric furnaces) to $2100 for the highest premium (gas) model.

You can reasonably plan to spend $700 to $1200 for a Goodman furnace, though this doesn’t include installation.

2 – Day & Night – again made by the same company that makes Carrier and Bryant brands. While the external structure looks different from the other brands made by the same manufacturer, the inner technology is nearly identical.

Similar to Goodman, these too achieve up to 98 AFUE, have 20 year warranty, and features that rival premium brands, such as modulating heat.

Like Goodman, they lack on reputation, but not on quality.  You can reasonably plan to spend $850 to $1250 for a Day & Night furnace, not including installation.

3 – York – this company also makes Coleman and Luxaire. York is a long established brand.

York warranties range from 5 years to lifetime depending on the model. They have multiple offerings in their furnace lineup ranging from the 80 to 95 AFUE.

York basic model is affordable at around $800, but their mid-grade and premium jump to $1400 or more.

York furnaces have a reputation for having noisier than average equipment, though their technology has evolved to include noise dampening features.

4 – Trane and American Standard are sister products. Both are on the premium side of brand names.

Trane is considered a top choice on the commercial product line for furnaces and thus their technological prowess is well known. For residential, they are pricier than our top two choices.

Trane AFUE goes up to 95, while they never skimp on features in their lineup. You can plan to pay $1300 and up for a Trane furnace, not including installation.

5 – Carrier rounds off our list based mostly on their reputation for reliability. They are another premium brand and arguably over priced considering what Day & Night is offering.

Carrier AFUE ranges from 80 to 98, and their features are essentially identical to the Day & Night offerings. Still, there are many thousands of satisfied Carrier customers who enjoy having a unit that will last 20+ years.

Plan to spend $1250 and up for Carrier furnaces, not including installation.

One final note, you can plan to spend more for installation on premium brands than the more affordable brands.

Part of this is the prestige factor that comes with being a ‘certified brand seller’ and the fact the market for premium furnaces allows for greater markup on those units.

Thus a Day & Night basic furnace may cost around $2000 installed, while the lowest you’ll likely find the Carrier basic model installed is $3000.

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