House Fencing Costs – Materials and Installation Pricing Guide 2017

Picture a yard fence. What’s it made of? How do the fence posts appear? What color is it? These are all rhetorical questions to have you realize there is far more design options to fences than most people consider. Height of a fence is an important factor, along with material, color and post design. Plus, you’ll probably want a gate, depending on how much the fence encloses the yard, or other segment of your property. Each of these items comes at a cost, and we’ll walk you through that to help plan your project and determine reasonable cost expectations for 2017.

Average Price per Linear Foot

The average cost has a very wide range, from $3 to $24 per linear foot installed. While that isn’t exactly helpful, it does help to understand which materials are more expensive. The average yard fence fits into a range of $1,800 to $3,500, which is based on 200 linear feet, or enough to fence a quarter acre lot.

The average lot size in the U.S. is 17,590 sq.ft. or about .4 acres. This is according the 2010 Census information. Outside of metropolitan areas, it goes to over a half acre (.64 to be exact). Fencing though is not measured by square footage, as presumably it would be around the inner edge of the perimeter. Instead, costs are determined by linear foot.

Before we get into the many factors that contribute to fencing costs, there are preliminary considerations.

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Exterior House Painting Price Guide – Hiring a Pro vs. DIY in 2017

Adding a fresh coat, or two, of paint to the outside of your house can be a highly satisfying home improvement project. When done, the neighbors will be sure to notice it and hopefully complement you. With quality paint, you’ll rest assured your home is good to go for another decade or so, showing off its visual outer layer.

It can also be a fun home improvement project. Focusing on design, immersed in colors, hopefully getting help from a partner, or three — all add to the fun. Though, doing a high quality job will likely require hiring a pro.

Going the DIY route will save on labor costs. Yet, some parts of the overall job can be slow going, unless painting homes is your livelihood. But, who says, you have to do all the work yourself? Or that a pro has to do all the work for you? In other words, whatever part of the job doesn’t sound like your cup of tea, you can hire a painting contractor for those steps.

The DIY approach

Before grabbing a paint can and brush, there a few things to plan for. Actually, the planning stages can easily take longer than the application of paint. The basic steps are:

  1. Plan for a period of time when it will be dry – likely during warmer months, though above 50 degrees and dry is the key.
  2. Survey the house / work to be done – be sure you know where main color goes and where trim paint goes. Also be on the lookout for any obvious places that could use repair.
  3. Thoroughly clean the old paint – this means using a pressure washer, wet rag (for trim), sanding and scraping. Ideally, you get to a clean, smooth dry surface.
  4. Optional repairs – In the previous step, damaged/rotten wood may make itself visible when thorough cleaning is done. Now is the time to repair. Arguably, this is the most important part of this job as it deals with structure of the house.
  5. Visit your paint store – pick out the color scheme, get the materials. Don’t worry, we list some of the materials later on to help you out.
  6. Prime the house – some paints today are mixed with a primer. Most are not, and this is the first coat to ensure the outer layer has something it can adhere to.
  7. Paint the main color – one coat if on a budget, two coats to be like the pros
  8. Paint the trim – this is likely a different color than the main house color, and it may be more than one additional color. Up to you!
  9. Paint doors, porches, shutters and other items attached to the house. Generally this is the same as the main color, but how you color scheme is up to you.
  10. Cleaning up – do not forget this step. You’ll gain much more satisfaction once this step is done. Unattended to paint, left anywhere, can make for a bigger mess than you may think. Also, make sure all unused paint is properly sealed and stored. Touch ups down the road can be had at no cost if the paint is appropriately sealed.

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Synthetic Shake and Shingle Pricing Guide 2017-2018

Synthetic shake and shingles are polymer-based material, or a combination of plastic and rubber. They are used on roofs where homeowners desire the classic look of wood or natural slate, with the added benefits from the synthetic blends.

Synthetic roofs are relatively new to the residential roofing market, first arriving in the early 1990’s. Their durability, environment friendly and affordability have all contributed to their rising success.

Costs

For installation on an average (2,300 sq.ft.), non-complex roof, it costs between $4.50 and $7.00 per sq.ft. With the averaged sized home, this totals to $10,350 to $16,100. If the existing roof needs to be torn off first, this can cost $2,250 to $3,500 more.

A complex roof with multiple roof angles, dormers, or greater pitch would add to labor charges. How much this adds depends on the contractor, the unique roof layout and other factors we’ll cover below.

Cost of Materials

Composite shingles and fake composite slate cost virtually the same. Formation is done via a molding process to ensure it resembles wood or stone, as the case may be.

The material is fairly light at about 1.25 pounds per tile, so essentially all roof types can handle such installation. The tiles can easily be cut on-site with a utility knife and are attached as simply as using a nail gun.

An asphalt shingle roofer ought to have the skills to properly install synthetic shake and shingle roofing.

Breaking Down Costs Into Specific Examples

With any home improvement project being handled by qualified professionals, it is in your best interest to get more than one quote, or preferably between three and seven.

The quoted figures they give you will either be total installation charges (one price for everything) or they’ll ideally itemize each cost so you can better compare their rates to the competition. For the example below, we ballpark certain figures as particular items, like building permits and disposal fees vary by region.

Composite Shingle Roofing: 2,490 sq.ft. (23 roofing squares) = $13,100 (includes labor+material)
Tear Off Existing Roof: $2,500
Disposal fees: $900
Additional Materials: Flashing, fasteners, underlayment, etc. = $2,250
Building Permit: $350
Total Project Cost = $19,100

Factors That Contribute To Overall Cost

While material costs are roughly the same between composite shingles and fake slate, the material costs will be based on manufacturer and distributor pricing. Usually, roofing contractors purchase product at wholesale through established distributors. There are a number of manufacturers in the marketplace, and the popular ones are:

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