Vinyl Siding Cost, Value and ROI for Homes 2017

PVC is widely understood as a heavy duty plastic-based material. The “V” in the middle of the acronym stands for Vinyl, which in the home siding market, represents the #1 selling material for most of the US. The PVC used for siding benefits from additives that resist color fading, and increase flexibility while not sacrificing durability.

For residential siding, vinyl is quite versatile. The horizontal plank (bevel) style is the most common cladding option for vinyl, but there are many more ways it is utilized as a cladding material for homes and buildings. On the east coast, its primary competition comes from wood and fiber cement, while stucco dominates the western part of the US.

Vinyl Siding Cost Information – Part 1

Because R-Value is a key factor when considering any siding material, it is important to note that vinyl siding takes this into consideration and that this skews its pricing data. Generally, costs for vinyl are based on material thickness, with most residential products ranging from .040 to .046 inches thick, or about 1/16th of an inch. At that level of thickness, the R-value is unsurprisingly low. However, vinyl comes in one of two primary variations: hollow-back and insulated, or foam-back. The foam-back provides at least 3 times (or more) the R-value, while increasing the cost by at most 3 times, or usually doubling it.

In terms of costs, Vinyl siding averages between $3.00 and $8.00 per sq. ft. installed. This breaks down to $3.00 to $4.00 on average per sq. ft. for hollow-back and $5.00 to $8.00 per sq. ft. for foam-back and/or deluxe vinyl siding. On average, hollow-back results in a $7,000 to $12,000 overall cost for a typical two bedroom sized home in America. Foam back averages $13,000 to $20,000 for the same property.

While “average” is a bit vague, we’ll break the costs down further (next section) and explain the factors that impact costs (2 sections below).

Costing Info – Part 2

As noted above, usually when you select vinyl siding for your home, you are selecting thickness and whether it is insulated material or not. These aren’t your only options, but they contribute to the costs more than other options. The style type is another key factor – whether panels are vertical or horizontal and whether making use of shingle or split-log style. Often the nuances within a particular style type, along with contractor experience and product quality are the additional primary factors that impact costs. To hopefully simplify things, let’s go with 2 examples of horizontal panels and what a job may entail to help understand the costing information more in depth.

Hollow-back Vinyl Siding: 1,900 sq. ft. x $2.75 = $5,225 (includes primary material/labor)
Housewrap: $200
Color Matching Existing Exterior Features: (i.e. outlet covers, wall vents, etc.) = $250
Updated Window Trim (Vinyl): $3,250
Additional Building Materials: (i.e. J-Channels, corner pieces) = $125
Nails: $55
(Optional) Detached Garage Update: (with all the above material considerations) x  700 sq.ft = additional $2,700
Building Permit: $250

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Fiber Cement Siding Cost and Pros and Cons in 2017

Fiber Cement as a siding option continues to be quite a popular choice. A review of U.S. Census data for new single-family houses sold in America shows Fiber Cement garners nearly a quarter of all siding materials. Brick, Wood and Vinyl are on a downward trend while Fiber Cement continues to gain in popularity. Stucco is, perhaps surprisingly, the #1 siding option in America where its popularity in the Western portion of the U.S. is enormous, but so is Fiber Cement in that region. The two materials in 2015 combined for a whooping 92% of the overall market out west.

Fiber Cement is commonly referred to as James Hardie, which is the company that originally created this plank board. It’s also called Cement Board, as the materials are made of cement, wood pulp, clay and sand. Fiber Cement is relatively heavy, quite sturdy and will last up to 100 years, while its surface usually needs repainting every 20 to 40 years.

Pricing Information – Part 1

Due to its weight, Fiber Cement routinely requires two workers to install each piece. For this reason, along with the idea that waste adds great expense to the project, the material is not well suited for DIY installation. There are essentially four styles of Fiber Cement: lap siding is the most common, shake and shingle, vertical panels, and artisan lap, which equals architectural grade of lap siding.

Fiber Cement lap siding costs $6.00 to $10.00 per sq. ft. installed. The other styles usually exceed $11.00 per sq. ft. Sticking with lap siding, the overall project cost for installing cement board on a typical two bedroom American home is $15,000 to $25,000. As there are numerous factors that impact the price, we will help explain that, but first let’s break down the costs. Note: this is a ballpark estimate example based on the national average cost of materials and job tasks.

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Exterior Door Cost in 2017 – Entry Door Pricing Guide

Replacing a front door to a home is a popular home remodeling project in recent years. Why? Because it offers great curb appeal and even better return on your investment.

via HGTV

There are some important material considerations for maximizing the cost-value and ROI. And of course, an entry door may include more than just the front of your home.

Cost Information – Part 1

When it comes to replacing your windows, wood is the more expensive material, but not so with doors. There are primarily three material types for main entry doors: wood, steel and fiberglass. Aluminum, vinyl and glass doors are less popular for main entrances, yet for storm doors and sliding doors they tend to be the most cost effective options.

Door installation can be a DIY project, though that depends a bit on the project and the door type. What generally takes the average homeowner five to seven hours to install takes a crew of two experienced contractors less than 2 hours to install.

For a single, steel front entrance door, the average cost ranges from $500 to $1,250 installed. Wood jumps up on the low end to $850, but on average it ranges $850 to $1,250 installed. Fiberglass costs about $750 to $1,500 on average for installation.

You’ll certainly see prices much higher than this, for doors alone. While also seeing prices for doors that are under $500, but the above information assumes middle of the road on door quality and about 2 hours of time for a quality contractor to do the work.

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